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Mancetter St Peter's Church

St Peter's Parish Church, Mancetter

Mancetter is a Parish with much history. The Roman road, Watling Street forms its Northern boundary and the Romans built a fort or staging post here. in the 4th Century AD it was called Manduessedum. In fact it is believed that Boudicea, the Ancient British Queen fought her last battle against the Romans somewhere between Mancetter and Hartshill.

Hartshill itself was part of Mancetter Parish until 1848 when the new Church was built there. Atherstone was also a Chapelry of Mancetter until 1825. The hamlet of Oldbury also lies within the old Parish. Oldbury is where an Iron Age fort has been found and where Oldbury Hall was situated until it was bombed during the World War II and subsequently demolished.

Of Mancetter itself, the Church of St Peter dates from the 13th Century. Its solid bulk and squat tower, the upper parts of which date from the 15th Century sit next to the black and white, timber framed Manor House and the almshouses. The Manor House is now a Hotel and Restaurant and the Churchyard is bisected by the main road. For more detail on the history of the Church and the monuments it contains see Benjamin Bartlett's 'Manduessum Romanorum, being the history and antiquities of the Parish of Mancetter' published in 1791 which is available in Nuneaton Library.

The inside of the Church contains memorials to the fallen of World War 1 and World War 2. More detail can be found here..

Apart from a Council Housing Estate and what remains of the extensive quarrying of the area, the Parish is still very rural. The River Anker flows through the water meadows on its way to meet the Tame at Tamworth, and the Coventry Canal, cut in the 1780s also passes through . Both the canal and the railway, built 1848, helped to transport material from local quarries.

Important names belonging to the Parish are Robert Glover and Joyce Lewis, the Protestant Martyrs (see Arthur Mee's 'Warwickshire' in the King's England series), the Bracebridge family and of course the Okeovers & Farmers of Oldbury. Benjamin Bartlett lived in the Grange at Hartshill.

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